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1 Dozen - Short Tales of the Strange and Spectacular

1 Dozen – Short Tales of the Strange and Spectacular by Milo James Fowler


1 Dozen collects 12 flash-sized tales in the slipstream, horror, and science fiction genres:

“A Creature Stirring” – A boy’s imagination may be his undoing — or his salvation.

“When Tomorrow Comes” – At the end of the world, friendship is all that really matters.

“Breathe” – An incredible gift becomes the source of violent sibling rivalry.

“Scuttle” – A milk run ends with a fatality — but not the kind you might think.

“Soul Smuggler” – Mercer doesn’t take kids into the afterlife, but one vagrant may have to go.

“Grandpa’s Bluetooth” – A senior citizen’s new hearing aid allows him to hear too much.

“Just Leave” – Home invaders get more than they bargained for.

“Stone in the Sky and Bread Below” – Sometimes the gods get hungry, too.

“For a Handful of Crowns” – Two teens do what they must to afford a plate of nachos.

“Suburban Legend” – Some urban myths really should be taken seriously.

“Captain Quasar and the ‘If Only’ Elixir of Opsanus Tau Prime” – The captain is willing to sacrifice everything for his quest, but at what cost?

“Tomorrow’s Dawn” – Trapped in a lunar tube with an alien terrorist doesn’t allow much hope for the future — or does it?

13,000 words; flash fiction (each story is 1,000 words or less)

These stories originally appeared in 10Flash Quarterly, 365 Tomorrows, Golden Visions Magazine, Everyday Weirdness, Flash Me Magazine, Liquid Imagination, the Frightmares anthology, Every Day Fiction, and Daily Science Fiction. On the surface, they might appear to have nothing in common; but there is a thematic thread that weaves them all together: Ties that bind. Each of these tales is about a relationship of some kind: family members, friends, enemies, or something in between. Many of the characters are good eggs, while others are just plain rotten — that’s the way it is sometimes when you buy a dozen. They’re related to each other in various ways, just as we are to the people in our lives — as those eggs are, sitting in that carton, bound for unknown ends.